New State Laws to Protect Recreational Marijuana Users

It’s time for employers in Illinois and Nevada to update their employment policies to reflect the new state marijuana laws that went into effect in January 2020. Here is a breakdown of the laws, their impact on employers, and the policy revisions that may be needed as a result of the new laws.   Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act Recreational drug use is now legal in Illinois under the

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New State Laws to Protect Recreational Marijuana Users

It’s time for employers in Illinois and Nevada to update their employment policies to reflect the new state marijuana laws that went into effect in January 2020. Here is a breakdown of the laws, their impact on employers, and the policy revisions that may be needed as a result of the new laws.   Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act Recreational drug use is now legal in Illinois under the

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New Requirements on Iowa's Job Safety and Health Notice

Employers in Iowa are required to post the updated version of the state’s Job Safety and Health notice, which describes new requirements under the OSH Act. What’s New for Job Safety and Health? The notice now states that employees may file a complaint with OSHA within 30 days of an act of retaliation or discrimination by an employer for making safety and health complaints or exercising their rights under the

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What Employers Can't Do Under the Coronavirus Relief Law

Signed into law March 18, 2020, the new Families First Coronavirus Response Act will apply from the effective date through December 31. The Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) have provided further interpretation, of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA or Act), advising only certain employers are required to provide employees with the leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19.  “When facing challenges such as this current

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Am I a Covered Employer Under the Updated FLMA?

Last week, on March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) into law. The new bill expands employee coverage under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and provides Emergency Paid Sick Leave. Since the signing of the bill, the Department of Labor (DOL) has provided further interpretation and guidance for employers, which is now available on their website. If you are unsure of your status

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New Oregon Law Expands Protections for Pregnant Workers

Oregon employers with more than six employees must comply with a new discrimination law that requires reasonable accommodations for employees and prospective employees who have limitations related to pregnancy, including childbirth and lactation. Unlike Oregon’s Family Leave Act or sick time law, there is no waiting period for employees prior to becoming eligible for these protections.   What This New Oregon Labor Law Requires The new Employer Accommodation for Pregnancy

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Colorado's New Standards for Overtime and Minimum Pay

At long last, Colorado’s Department of Labor and Employment has issued the new Colorado Overtime and Minimum Pay Standards Order—COMPS Order #36—which must be posted in workplaces, in both English and Spanish, by March 16, 2020.   As of January 1, 2020, Colorado’s minimum wage is adjusted annually based on inflation. For the year 2020, the state’s minimum wage is $12.00 per hour or $8.98 for tipped employees. Unemancipated minors

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Update to Virginia's Earned Income Tax Credit Notice

Virginia’s Department of Social Services has released an update to the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) notice, which is in both English and Spanish. While the notice was issued in February, it has a revision date of 9/2019. New Requirements for Earned Income Tax Credit The EITC notice now states that earned income tax credit is for people who work for someone else or own/run a business or farm.

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New Requirements on Utah's Safety and Health Notice

In February 2020, Utah’s Labor Commission released an updated version of the state’s Safety and Health (UOSH) notice. Under the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act (Utah Act), employers are required to provide a safe and healthful working environment for all employees—a workplace that is free from any hazards that might result in the death of an employee or cause serious physical harm. What’s New for Utah Employees and Employers?

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Vermont's Unemployment Insurance Benefits Have Changed

New information for employees who are forced to leave their job as a result of domestic violence, sexual violence, or stalking Employers in Vermont must post a new version of the state’s Unemployment Insurance notice.  The notice, which was issued by Vermont’s Department of Labor (DOL), includes new information for employees who are forced to leave their job as a result of domestic violence, sexual violence, or stalking. These employees

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Increase to Nevada's Safety and Health (OSHA) Penalties

Nevada’s Safety and Health notice has been updated to include the new federal OSHA penalties for employer violations of the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Act. The notice has a revision date of 1/20. New Employer Violation Penalties The Nevada Safety and Health notice includes the following employer violation categories: serious, nonserious, failure-to-correct, willful or repeated, and criminal violations. Here are the updated employer penalties: Employers who violate the Act

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