2020–2021 Minimum Wage Increases for City of Chicago, IL

The City of Chicago has updated its Minimum Wage notice to reflect new wage requirements for 2020 and 2021. Below we’ve outlined all the details for Chicago employers and employees.   Effective January 1, 2020:   The minimum wage for youth workers is $8.00 per hour. Effective July 1, 2020:   The minimum wage for large employers (21 or more employees) will increase to $14.00 per hour. The minimum wage for tipped

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2020–2021 Minimum Wage Increases for City of Chicago, IL

The City of Chicago has updated its Minimum Wage notice to reflect new wage requirements for 2020 and 2021. Below we’ve outlined all the details for Chicago employers and employees.   Effective January 1, 2020:   The minimum wage for youth workers is $8.00 per hour. Effective July 1, 2020:   The minimum wage for large employers (21 or more employees) will increase to $14.00 per hour. The minimum wage for tipped

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Oregon Receives Changes to its Minimum Wage and OSHA notice

Oregon adds a new section to its Labor Law Poster: Minimum Wage (June 2020) The minimum wage has increased across the state, and is broken into 3 groups by counties: Standard – $12.00 per hour Portland Metro Area – $13.25 per hour Non-Urban Counties – $11.50 per hour Each region is defined on the notice The notice has been simplified and information regarding meal & rest periods, final paycheck, and

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Are Employers Liable If Employees Are Exposed to Coronavirus at Work?

Businesses are starting to reopen, but are they also opening themselves up to liability? As employers begin to welcome employees back there is widespread concern that employers may face lawsuits if employees are exposed to COVID-19 in the workplace.     While companies are primarily concerned with providing a safe environment for customers and employees, it is unclear what that means in the context of a contagious virus that seems

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What You Need to Know About Sick Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

For the first time in U.S. history, the federal government has granted employees of certain private employers and government employees paid sick leave. The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) gives employees up to two weeks of paid sick leave and extends the leave provided under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The provisions of the new laws are complex, but here’s what you need to know. What the

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New Jersey Law Prohibits Worker Missclassification

New Jersey adds new section to its Labor Law Poster: Prohibiting Worker Misclassification (June 2020) The new notice defines worker misclassification, as well as the designations of ‘Employee’ and ‘Contractor’ under New Jersey Law. People who work and are paid are assumed to be employees unless the employer can establish all three parts of the ‘ABC’ test. This is the case regardless of whether the employee received a 1099 or

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Nevada Updates its Wage and Overtime Bulletin

Nevada’s Labor Law Poster receives updates to its: Minimum Wage Bulletin Effective July 1, 2020: The minimum wage for workers in the lower tier (those employees who have been offered qualifying health benefits) is $8.00 per hour. The minimum wage for all other employees is $9.00 per hour. Please note: this information is already contained on the existing notice Overtime Bulletin Effective July 1, 2020: Employees who have been offered qualifying health

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Maine Makes Changes to its Earned Income Tax Credits

Maine’s Labor Law Poster receives update: Earned Income Tax Credits (May 2020) A section has been added regarding Earned Income Tax Credits stating: Employees may be eligible for federal and state Earned Income Tax Credits Employees may apply for these tax credits on their tax returns. Effective date 3/20 We are publishing a new Maine (ME) labor law poster that includes these mandatory updates. Visit the Maine labor law poster page to

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Preparing for Post-COVID-19 Return-to-Work Policies

Reopening the economy: it’s a simple phrase that belies the difficulties that lie ahead. Yet, for many employers, the phrase oversimplifies the complexities they face as they figure out how to safely bring their employees back to the workplace.   Although it may not yet be clear when you’ll be able to reopen your workplace, now is the time for your organization to put together a strategy for reopening rather

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How Workplaces Can Comply With Social Distancing Requirements

Separation anxiety: the coronavirus pandemic has given this phrase a whole new meaning. Instead of stressing out when we’re apart, we now have to worry about being together. And, over the years, the workplace has become a place where individual spaces are few and far between the prevalence of shared workspaces, common areas, and open office plans make it challenging for employees to keep their distance from each other. As

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How the Courts Separate Personal from Business Use of Cell Phones

Consider a manager calling to reschedule a meeting, a delivery driver phoning for the next dispatch, or a salesperson texting their spouse while driving to an appointment, and it’s easy to see how often distracted driving occurs while “acting in the scope of employment,” a key criterion that has been broadly construed in cases involving distracted drivers using their cell phones.   The Breakdown Even if the employee is off

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